Dragør


This old seafaring town on the island of Amager is filled with well-preserved half-timbered ocher and pink eightenth-century cottages with steep red-tile or thatched roofs, many of which are under the protection of the National Trust. Dragør (pronounced Drah-wer) was a busy port on the herring-rich Baltic Sea in the early Middle Ages, and when fishing fell off, it became just another sleepy little waterfront village. After 1520, Amager Island and its villages - Dragør and Store Magleby - were inhabited by the Dutch, who brought their own customs, Low-German language, and agricultural expertise to Amager, especially their love of bulb flowers. In Copenhagen you still see wooden-shoed Amager locals selling their hyacinths, tulips, daffodils, and lilies in the streets.
excerpt from
Frommer's Denmark

03 March 2002



Dragor-01




Dragor-02



Dragor-03



Dragor-04



Dragor-05

Restaurant Beghuset

Dragor-06



Dragor-07



Dragor-08



Dragor-09



Dragor-10



Dragor-11



Dragor-12


We love hearing from everyone, so please email us at LivingInLondon@aol.com

Namo WebEditor Link